Nov 042013
 

David Colquhoun’s damning indictment of the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC) and certain other organisations:

Conclusions

The main conclusion from all of this is that the General Pharmaceutical Council is almost criminally negligent. It continues to allow pharmacists, Anthony Pinkus among them, to endanger lives. It fails to apply its own declared principles. The members of its Council are not doing their job.

Individual pharmacists vary a lot, from the superb to those who believe in quackery. Some, perhaps many, are embarrassed by the fact that their employer compels them to sell rubbish. It’s too much to expect that they’ll endanger their mortgage payments by speaking out about it, but the best ones will take you aside and explain that they can’t recommend it.

The GPhC itself is regulated by the Professional Standards Authority, the subject of my last post. We can’t expect anything sensible from them.

In the USA there is a shocking number of pharmacists who seem to believe in quackery. In the UK. nobody knows, though judging by their failure to vote against the daftest of all scams. homeopathy, there is no cause for complacency here.

It seems that there will have to be big improvements in pharmacy education before you can have much confidence in the quality of the advice that you get in a pharmacy.

It seems to me that society, in general, is not informed and that various businesses push their agenda to generate more revenue and increase profit. This has created a weak and flawed regulator.

Jul 032013
 

Following the ASA’s judgment on misleading advertising by homeopaths, Steven Novella provides his analysis on the judgment.

As Novella mentions, it’s probably a good idea to remind ourselves of Gorski’s article on why it is important that rigorous controls are maintained on all treatments and why we should not fall for a seemingly harmless “What’s the harm?” argument:

Article by Kulvinder Singh Matharu – 2013

Dec 122012
 

It’s just so easy showing that homeopathy is junk, a pseudoscience, and nothing more than a placebo. But it bothers me that so many people think that homeopathy is real. The nonsense people believe! Anyway, Donald Prothero has recently posted a good article on homeopathy:

Worth a read, and quite funny.

Article by Kulvinder Singh Matharu – 2012

Jul 172012
 

Homeopaths continually demonstrate that they have no real understanding of morality:

A consortium of pharmaceutical companies in Germany have been paying a journalist €43,000 to run a set of web sites that denigrates an academic who has published research into  their products.

These companies, who make homeopathic sugar pills, were exposed in the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung in an article, Schmutzige Methoden der sanften Medizin (The Dirty Tricks of Alternative Medicine.)

Disgusting.

The victim of the attacks, Edzard Ernst, was instrumental, alongside Simon Singh, to further highlight the bogus nature of the foundations of chiropractic treatments in 2009.

Article by Kulvinder Singh Matharu – 2012

Jul 012012
 

Not only does it seem clear that the Society of Homeopaths is aware of illegal activity by their members, but that the society condones and encourages such illegal activity.

I suppose that such behaviour is to be expected from those selling snake-oil.

Article by Kulvinder Singh Matharu – 2012

Jun 272012
 

I hope so.

If evidence and reason cannot end homeopathy, the law will. – Andy Lewis

However, like a zombie from a low-budget horror movie returning to eat our brains, homeopathic “medicines” are likely to be repackaged and sold to the public; greed is a great motivator and can triumph over ethics.

Article by Kulvinder Singh Matharu – 2012

May 212012
 

There comes a time when it’s clear that only the delusional or the deceitful claim evidence for their case when, in reality, said evidence indicates the opposite. Homeopaths and proponents of homeopathy have exhibited such delusional/deceitful behaviours regularly. The Quackometer and Zeno’s Blog describe the most recent of these behaviours:

Article by Kulvinder Singh Matharu – 2012

May 082012
 

Dr Steven Novella describes some nonsense from the homeopathy community who were promoting homeopathic “treatments” for whooping cough:

Some people argue that, even if homeopathic treatments don’t cure, at least they don’t harm. Well, that’s nonsense as well. Use of homeopathic “treatments” often discourages the patient from seeking proper medical care. The above article, and the website What’s the harm? explain quite clearly.

A related article is:

Article by Kulvinder Singh Matharu – 2012